Research has pointed to the brain as the next frontier in treating our bodies. Recent studies indicate Rekinetics could lead the way in clinical applications. 

 Examining a Novel Physical Rehabilitation Technique (January, 2016). Participants in the Rekinetics group experienced up to a 120% increase in force output. Across the 77 participants, those in the Rekinetics group demonstrated more force output with statistical significance (p<.01). This is the first exercise to show greater contralateral than ipsilateral strength gain.

Examining a Novel Physical Rehabilitation Technique (January, 2016). Participants in the Rekinetics group experienced up to a 120% increase in force output. Across the 77 participants, those in the Rekinetics group demonstrated more force output with statistical significance (p<.01). This is the first exercise to show greater contralateral than ipsilateral strength gain.

Considering brain dynamics in musculoskeletal rehabilitation is an untapped arena. We look forward to the exciting future of neuroscience applications in sports medicine to optimise outcomes.
— Dustin Grooms, PhD, and Gregory Myer, PhD, Upgraded hardware─What about the software? Brain updates for return to play following ACL reconstruction. Br J Sports Med. October 2016.

Why it works

Since we have not yet been able to look inside the brain during research, the reasons for why a technique like Rekinetics works are still up for debate. Below are three of the most prominent hypotheses.

Brain scan_1.jpg

Bilateral Access Model - When you make a movement on one side of your body, this model says that you develop blueprints for that movement. Those blueprints are accessible to both hemispheres of the brain. If one side of the body has a better blueprint, the hypothesis is that Rekinetics can effectively transfer that blueprint to be used by the other side. An example of the blueprint would be the neurological pathways the brain uses to communicate with and activate a muscle.

Hemispheric Synchronization_1.jpg

Cross Activation Model - During movements of your left limb, for example, your neuromuscular system activates the right limb. Since Rekinetics exercises were developed for how the brain processes movement, this cross activation may have more of a pronounced effect than in similar experiments. 

Hemispheric Synchronization - When the brain's hemispheres are firing in sync, both cognitive and physical advantages can be gained. Since Rekinetics uses both bilateral and unilateral exercises, the technique may be leading to greater synchronization and more neurological activation.


The brain as the next frontier

The below quote from "Dustin Grooms, PhD, and Gregory Meyer, PhD, Updated Hardware, 2016" speaks to the future direction of sports rehabilitation. References are included in the Recommended Reading section.

"We now know that ACL [and other ligaments] provides more than simple mechanical stability, and the injury and recovery process has systemic neuromuscular effects. Rehabilitative interventions are needed to restore dynamic knee stability. However, looking beyond the joint for optimal development of dynamic stability may be warranted. Emerging evidence indicates that ACL [and other ligament] injury induces a mild neurological insult to the central nervous system (CNS), causing neuroplastic changes due to the lost mechanoreceptors, pain and developed motor compensations. Neuroplastic disruption likely begins immediately after ACL injury (and perhaps even before as the noncontact mechanism is a motor coordination error) and progresses until altered motor strategies become the norm. Restoring baseline function becomes a fight against maladaptive neuroplasticity developed in the wake of the altered CNS input and subsequent motor output compensations. The answer could rely on evolved neuroscience technologies that can now add the brain as a key rehabilitation target."


Recommended reading

  • Grooms, D., Page, S., et al, Neuroplasticity associated with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, 2016.
  • Beyer, K. S., Fukuda, D. H., et al, Short-term unilateral resistance training results in cross education of strength without changes in muscle size, activation, or endocrine response, 2016.
  • Baumeister J, Reinecke K, Weiss M. Changed cortical activity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a joint position paradigm: an EEG study. Scand J Med Sci Sports 2008.
  • Leung, M., Rantalainen, T., Teo, W. P., and Kidgell, D., Motor cortex excitability is not differentially modulated following skill and strength training, 2016.
  • Lepley AS, Gribble PA, Thomas AC, et al. Quadriceps neural alterations in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed patients: a 6-month longitudinal investigation. Scand J Med Sci Sports 2015.
  • Hendy, A., Lamon, S., The Cross Education Phenomenon: Brain and Beyond, 2017.